1. Ballistic pack by Goruck. MOLLE (MOdular Lightweight Load-carrying Equipment) compatible; includes a hydration pack; and, as you can see, is very minimally branded. The odd reverse flag is the Goruck logo, such as it is. The gear is milspec, but designed for civilians.
From Zero History:

"It’s an obsession with the idea not just of the right stuff, but of the special stuff. Equipment fetishism. The costume and semiotics of achingly elite police military units. Intense desire to possess same, of course, and in turn to be associated with that world. With its competence, its cocksure exclusivity."

    Ballistic pack by Goruck. MOLLE (MOdular Lightweight Load-carrying Equipment) compatible; includes a hydration pack; and, as you can see, is very minimally branded. The odd reverse flag is the Goruck logo, such as it is. The gear is milspec, but designed for civilians.

    From Zero History:

    "It’s an obsession with the idea not just of the right stuff, but of the special stuff. Equipment fetishism. The costume and semiotics of achingly elite police military units. Intense desire to possess same, of course, and in turn to be associated with that world. With its competence, its cocksure exclusivity."

  2. What Price Glory →

    What Price Glory deals in reproductions of World War II-era US and UK militaria. There’s a dash of Scots clothes (sporrans, kilts, etc.), Indochina/Vietnam gear, and Indiana Jones reproductions for good measure. Want a repro pair of US Army mountain boots? You got ‘em. WAC shoes? Here they are. GI sweaters, trousers, etc.? Here.

    The level of obsessive detail may not quite be the same as Buzz Rickson’s, but there is an extent to which I think this related to the “gear-queer” phenomenon noted in Zero History. This is, of course, not for the modern mall-ninja. But the underlying element of attraction to the tactical and military may not be all that dissimilar.

    From Zero History:

    "They want to be soldiers?"

    "Not to be. To self-identify as. However secretly. To imagine they may be mistaken for, or at least associated with. Virtually none of these products will ever be used for anything remotely like what they were designed for. Of course that’s true of most of the contents of your traditional army-navy store. Whole universes of wistful male fantasy in those places. But the level of consumer motivation we’re seeing, the fact that these are often what amount to luxury goods, and priced accordingly. That’s new. I felt like a neurosurgeon, when this was brought to my attention, discovering a patient whose nervous system is congenitally and fully exposed. It’s just so nakedly obvious. Fantastic, really.”

  3. Adidas GSG9 boot.
From Spook Country:

"But I have seen your systema, cousin." Brotherman raised a white plastic shopping bag. "Carlito sends you shoes." He passed Tito the bag. The high-topped black shoes still had their white-and-blue Adidas logo tags. Tito sat on the edge of the bagged mattress and removed his boots. He laced the Adidas shoes and pulled them on over medium-weight cotton socks, removed the tags, and carefully tightened the laces before tying them. He stood up, shifting his weight, taking the measure of these new shoes. "GSG9 model," Brotherman said. "Special police in Germany."

    Adidas GSG9 boot.

    From Spook Country:

    "But I have seen your systema, cousin." Brotherman raised a white plastic shopping bag. "Carlito sends you shoes." He passed Tito the bag. The high-topped black shoes still had their white-and-blue Adidas logo tags. Tito sat on the edge of the bagged mattress and removed his boots. He laced the Adidas shoes and pulled them on over medium-weight cotton socks, removed the tags, and carefully tightened the laces before tying them. He stood up, shifting his weight, taking the measure of these new shoes. "GSG9 model," Brotherman said. "Special police in Germany."

  4. Dazzle Camouflage, as seen on the French cruiser Gloire.
From Zero History:

Out in the bike yard, she’d sprayed the penguin’s silver Mylar with black, random, wonky geometrics, their edges fuzzy, like graffiti. Real dazzle had sharp edges, she said, but there was no way to mask the inflated balloon. She used a piece of brown cardboard, cut in a concave curve, to mask approximately, then went back with a dull gray, to fill in the remaining silver. When that had dried a little, she’d further confused it with an equally dull beige, ghosting lines in with the cardboard mask. The result wouldn’t conceal the penguin against any background at all, particularly the sky, but it broke it up visually, made it difficult to read as an object.

    Dazzle Camouflage, as seen on the French cruiser Gloire.

    From Zero History:

    Out in the bike yard, she’d sprayed the penguin’s silver Mylar with black, random, wonky geometrics, their edges fuzzy, like graffiti. Real dazzle had sharp edges, she said, but there was no way to mask the inflated balloon. She used a piece of brown cardboard, cut in a concave curve, to mask approximately, then went back with a dull gray, to fill in the remaining silver. When that had dried a little, she’d further confused it with an equally dull beige, ghosting lines in with the cardboard mask. The result wouldn’t conceal the penguin against any background at all, particularly the sky, but it broke it up visually, made it difficult to read as an object.