1. Why pop-ups pop up everywhere →

    Temporary shops and restaurants were once a way for artists to subvert empty urban spaces. Now, they’re just as likely to be part of a corporate marketing strategy

    One cannot help but imagine the hand of Hubertus Bigend and Blue Ant moving behind the appropriation of pop-ups by larger corporations seeking to shore up their brands in new and interesting ways.

    From Zero History:

    "But then I remembered Hubertus, ideas of his, things he’d done. Guerrilla marketing strategies. Weird inversions of customary logic. The Japanese idea of secret brands. The deliberate construction of parallel microeconomies, where knowledge is more congruent than wealth."

  2. An enterprising soul on CafePress has created a Gabriel Hounds t-shirt.
From Zero History:

No exterior signage. The label, inside, below the back of the collar, was undyed leather, thick as most belts. On it had been branded not a name but the vague and vaguely disturbing outline of what she took to be a baby-headed dog. The branding iron appeared to have been twisted from a single length of fine wire, then heated, pressed down unevenly into the leather, which was singed in places. Centered directly beneath this, sewn under the bottom edge of the leather patch, was a small folded tab of white woven ribbon, machine-embroidered with three crisp, round black dots, arranged in a triangle. Indicating size?
Her gaze was drawn to the brand of the hound, with its almost featureless kewpie head.

    An enterprising soul on CafePress has created a Gabriel Hounds t-shirt.

    From Zero History:

    No exterior signage. The label, inside, below the back of the collar, was undyed leather, thick as most belts. On it had been branded not a name but the vague and vaguely disturbing outline of what she took to be a baby-headed dog. The branding iron appeared to have been twisted from a single length of fine wire, then heated, pressed down unevenly into the leather, which was singed in places. Centered directly beneath this, sewn under the bottom edge of the leather patch, was a small folded tab of white woven ribbon, machine-embroidered with three crisp, round black dots, arranged in a triangle. Indicating size?

    Her gaze was drawn to the brand of the hound, with its almost featureless kewpie head.